What does rewilding look like?

Rewilding produces landscapes with an abundance of plant and wildlife providing opportunities for people to thrive socially and economically

Carrifran 2015Carrifran in the Scottish Borders shows how bare hills can transform into a flourishing of woodland, colour and rich bird song. It’s part of the Borders Forest Trust rewilding initiative. Read more about this and others restoring nature in Britain

Photo: Borders Forest Trust

Carrifran 2015

Carrifran 2015Carrifran in the Scottish Borders shows how bare hills can transform into a flourishing of woodland, colour and rich bird song. It’s part of the Borders Forest Trust rewilding initiative. Read more about this and others restoring nature in Britain

Photo: Borders Forest Trust

Carrifran 1999 When the Carrifran Wildwood group took over the Carrifran valley in 1999 it was in a poor state from hundreds of years of sheep nibbling. The group planted half a million trees in its first decade of work. Expansion of the woodland from now will be more gradual and natural. 

Photo: Borders Forest Trust

Carrifran 1999

Carrifran 1999 When the Carrifran Wildwood group took over the Carrifran valley in 1999 it was in a poor state from hundreds of years of sheep nibbling. The group planted half a million trees in its first decade of work. Expansion of the woodland from now will be more gradual and natural. 

Photo: Borders Forest Trust

Celtic rainforestWe have remnants of native rainforest in Britain. These last patches of atlantic oak woodland, like Coed Felinrhyd in Wales, are rich habitats of tree, lichen, moss and fern. We could see these amazing habitats expand through rewilding.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Celtic rainforest

Celtic rainforestWe have remnants of native rainforest in Britain. These last patches of atlantic oak woodland, like Coed Felinrhyd in Wales, are rich habitats of tree, lichen, moss and fern. We could see these amazing habitats expand through rewilding.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Nature-based economiesRewilding could take a zoning approach and support nature-based economies through a core area of land dedicated to nature recovery with only light human activity, with a buffer zone supporting recreational fishing, forestry, livestock and more. Read more about nature-based economies

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Nature-based economies

Nature-based economiesRewilding could take a zoning approach and support nature-based economies through a core area of land dedicated to nature recovery with only light human activity, with a buffer zone supporting recreational fishing, forestry, livestock and more. Read more about nature-based economies

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Babies to adultsMany native woodlands in Britain are dying, usually due to deer or sheep grazing on young tree shoots. Where woodland is regenerating, you can see baby trees, toddlers, young adults and old yins. Like here in the Cairngorms, for example.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Babies to adults

Babies to adultsMany native woodlands in Britain are dying, usually due to deer or sheep grazing on young tree shoots. Where woodland is regenerating, you can see baby trees, toddlers, young adults and old yins. Like here in the Cairngorms, for example.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Deer stalkingWe have unnaturally high numbers of deer in parts of Britain, particularly Scotland. Their soaring populations are stopping trees from growing. With no natural predators, we will always need people to cull deer.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Deer stalking

Deer stalkingWe have unnaturally high numbers of deer in parts of Britain, particularly Scotland. Their soaring populations are stopping trees from growing. With no natural predators, we will always need people to cull deer.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

The little thingsRewilding is about abundance. That doesn’t just mean more trees but an abundance of all nature. Insects and small animals flourish when flowers, plants and fungi flourish. They then become fodder for further up the food chain.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

The little things

The little thingsRewilding is about abundance. That doesn’t just mean more trees but an abundance of all nature. Insects and small animals flourish when flowers, plants and fungi flourish. They then become fodder for further up the food chain.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Natural engineeringRewilding leaves nature to shape the landscape. The beaver is a flamboyant part of that – creating dams and ponds with their precision nibbling, which support a range of wildlife and prevent flooding. Other important land shapers include the lynx and wolf.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Natural engineering

Natural engineeringRewilding leaves nature to shape the landscape. The beaver is a flamboyant part of that – creating dams and ponds with their precision nibbling, which support a range of wildlife and prevent flooding. Other important land shapers include the lynx and wolf.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Living systemsA rewilded landscape restores living systems so they start working as they should. This means deer can live in the woodlands where they belong, in numbers that the land can sustain, and not rely on people feeding them.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Living systems

Living systemsA rewilded landscape restores living systems so they start working as they should. This means deer can live in the woodlands where they belong, in numbers that the land can sustain, and not rely on people feeding them.

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Nature and peopleRewilding isn’t about excluding people. Nature can’t thrive when it’s being chopped, mined, extracted and destroyed but we are a part of nature. We can enjoy being in among trees, meadows and abundant wildlife, and use it wisely.

Photo: scotlanbigpicture.com

Nature and people

Nature and peopleRewilding isn’t about excluding people. Nature can’t thrive when it’s being chopped, mined, extracted and destroyed but we are a part of nature. We can enjoy being in among trees, meadows and abundant wildlife, and use it wisely.

Photo: scotlanbigpicture.com

Wood dwellersMany species in Britain disappeared when their homes, usually woodland or forest, disappeared. If we can stimulate biodiversity, we can re-establish homes for pine martens, red squirrels, different species of owl, bats and more

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com

Wood dwellers

Wood dwellersMany species in Britain disappeared when their homes, usually woodland or forest, disappeared. If we can stimulate biodiversity, we can re-establish homes for pine martens, red squirrels, different species of owl, bats and more

Photo: scotlandbigpicture.com